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A research-based residency in Chicago and Detroit by students of Design for the Living World class, by the invitation of 6018North in Chicago and FILTER Detroit and Hamburg. The fact-finding visit is a platform for exchange of knowledge between students and individuals and organizations who engage in community-building, small-scale local economies and community education.

Photo above: Workshop with Nance Klemh at the remediation community garden in Chicago.


Title: We Care a Lot: Stewardship of Land In the Neighborhood, Conservation – Coalition – Collaboration
Dates: Sept.20-Oct.1st, 2015.
Location: Chicago, IL and Detroit, MI
Students: Maria Christou, Tino Holzmann, Barbara Niklas, Anastasia Reschke, Konouz Saeed and William Schwartz.
The Class of the Design for the Living World in collaboration with: 6018North Chicago and FILTER Detroit and Hamburg
Supported by: Kulturbehörde Hamburg and Goethe Institut Chicago


 

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Publication – We Care a Lot: Stewardship of Land In the Neighborhood, Conservation – Coalition – Collaboration (pdf)

Published with the support by Hochschule für bildende Künste (HFBK) Hamburg, Kulturbehörde Hamburg and Goethe Institut Chicago, 2016


Chicago-local-initiatives-panorama

Chicago: Local Initiatives

Over five intense days, September 21-25, 2015, we learned that Chicago has a strong, socially engaged art community. This is due both to strong precedents and support and a lack of commercially oriented art. We talked with people who are engaged with small-scale socially conscious economies, urban agriculture, and community education. We realized that such initiatives are seeds that grow a city of resilient neighborhoods.

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Detroit: Local Initiatives

Detroit: Local Initiatives

From September 26 to October 1, 2015, we met a number of inspiring individuals and learned about some exciting initiatives in Detroit, such as the Boggs Center, whose legacy dates from the city’s collapse in the 1960s after the fall of the automotive industry. In response, activists visualized a future built on politically empowered residents; Richard Feldman calls it the city’s re-evolution. The residents who stayed in the inner city understood the potential of unused spaces – the urban voids that became available for urban agriculture, a practice that Detroit celebrates today.

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LINKS AND REFERENCES, CHICAGO

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LINKS AND REFERENCES, DETROIT

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